Tips for specific business types

Tips for specific business types

Aquatic Centres

You can download and read our fact sheet for more water efficiency tips.

Our pool water loss calculator [xlsx, 1.2 MB] can also help you to find out how much water loss is costing you.

Hidden leaks can be in pool structures or circulation systems.

To find them, you need to check for:

  • Cracks in the pool shell
  • Cracks in the balance tank
  • Visible structural damage, such as expansion joints, loose tiles or missing grout
  • Rust staining on the pool shell wall, inside gutters and guttering

How to check the pool structure for leaks

  1. Turn off the balance tank
  2. Place a bucket on the top step of the pool
  3. Fill the bucket to the same level of the pool
  4. Leave for 24 hours

If in 24 hours the level of the pool is lower than the level in the bucket, then you could have a leak in your pool structure.

To locate that leak, add dye to the pool and watch where it flows. If it flows to the wall and disappears, then you have a crack in the pool wall.

How to check the pool plumbing for leaks

  1. Place a bucket on the top step of the pool
  2. Fill the bucket to the same level of the pool
  3. Leave for 24 hours with the pump operating as normal, then check the level
  4. Repeat steps 1-3 with the pump off
  5. Recheck and compare the levels.

If the level is less with the pump running, you may have a leak in the plumbing.

Pools and spas

The main loss of water from pools and spas comes from evaporation. You can reduce the amount of water lost to evaporation by covering pools and spas when they're not in use. This will help keep your pool clean and the water warmer, and will save you from topping up the pool/spa as often.

Top 7 tips:

  • Check for leaks regularly.
  • Fix any leaks as fast as possible.
  • Correct the chemical balance. This will mean you won't have to empty your pool as often
  • Reduce backwash frequency and volume if possible – check with your council to confirm guidelines.
  • Check that the filter works properly.
  • Keep a cover on your pool when it's not in use to limit the number of times you have to top it up.
  • Keep pool temperatures at the minimum acceptable to reduce water loss through evaporation.

Cooling towers

Top tips for reducing water used by your cooling tower

  • Install a sub meter on the make-up water line to monitor cooling tower water usage.
  • Check for water loss through leaks, faulty float valves, overflowing, splashing, or other.
  • Check that water efficiency is part of the servicing agreement with your cooling tower contractors.
  • Check that bleed solenoids or valves are functioning correctly for both operation and closing.
  • Use good quality water for cooling tower make-up. Poor or inadequate quality water may need to be treated prior to topping up a cooling tower
  • Use rainwater for make-up water (Filtration and/or treatment may be required)
  • Ensure drift eliminators are fitted.
  • Use alternative water treatment methods, like ozone, ionisation and ultra-violet disinfection. These allow towers to operate at higher cycles of concentrations, reducing blowdown, chemical requirements and associated costs.
  • Use cooling tower bleed for toilet flushing or wash down.
  • Return condensate from cooling coils back to the tower. This is generally clean cool water.
  • Minimise heat loading on towers where possible. You can keep lighting to a minimum, and turn machinery off when not in use.
  • Ensure your service contractor cleans and recalibrates the TDS / pH sensors on a regular basis. These records should all be available from your contractor and stored for future reference.
  • Set TDS bleed to the maximum SA Water limit of 2,000mg/L (see Trade Waste Guideline No. 16) if you are discharging cooling tower waste to a sewer. This will maximise the number of times water can be cycled through the tower.
  • Install automatic bleed and dosing equipment controlled by TDS and pH sensors. This will ensure that the tower only bleeds once a set limit has been reached. It also makes sure that the tower is dosed adequately to maximise cycles of concentration.

Download and read our information sheet about cooling towers to learn how you can improve their efficiencies.

Evaporative air conditioners

  • Regularly check for leaks and excessive bleed.
  • As units age, performance can become compromised. Regular maintenance and servicing is recommended to maintain efficiency.

Commercial Properties

Cooling towers

Top tips for reducing water used by your cooling tower

  • Install a sub meter on the make-up water line to monitor cooling tower water usage.
  • Check for water loss through leaks, faulty float valves, overflowing, splashing, or other.
  • Check that water efficiency is part of the servicing agreement with your cooling tower contractors.
  • Check that bleed solenoids or valves are functioning correctly for both operation and closing.
  • Use good quality water for cooling tower make-up. Poor or inadequate quality water may need to be treated prior to topping up a cooling tower
  • Use rainwater for make-up water (Filtration and/or treatment may be required)
  • Ensure drift eliminators are fitted.
  • Use alternative water treatment methods, like ozone, ionisation and ultra-violet disinfection. These allow towers to operate at higher cycles of concentrations, reducing blowdown, chemical requirements and associated costs.
  • Use cooling tower bleed for toilet flushing or wash down.
  • Return condensate from cooling coils back to the tower. This is generally clean cool water.
  • Minimise heat loading on towers where possible. You can keep lighting to a minimum, and turn machinery off when not in use.
  • Ensure your service contractor cleans and recalibrates the TDS / pH sensors on a regular basis. These records should all be available from your contractor and stored for future reference.
  • Set TDS bleed to the maximum SA Water limit of 2,000mg/L (see Trade Waste Guideline No. 16) if you are discharging cooling tower waste to a sewer. This will maximise the number of times water can be cycled through the tower.
  • Install automatic bleed and dosing equipment controlled by TDS and pH sensors. This will ensure that the tower only bleeds once a set limit has been reached. It also makes sure that the tower is dosed adequately to maximise cycles of concentration.

Download and read our information sheet about cooling towers to learn how you can improve their efficiencies.

Irrigated public open spaces

Laundries

To improve the water efficiency of your laundry, you can:

  • Outsource laundry cleaning to water-efficient commercial facilities.
  • Operate washing machines only when they are full.
  • Train and review staff performance to make sure laundry machines are operated correctly.
  • Use the manufacturer's recommended settings on each machine.
  • Check that the water level is correct during operation.
  • Discuss potential water efficiency improvements with your chemical supplier.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Retrofit a tank on the washer to capture final rinse water. Use it as pre-wash for the next cycle
  • Convert cooling operations to closed loop systems on dry cleaning machines with single-pass cooling.
  • Install an ozone system to reduce the need for chemicals and water. Fewer rinse cycles are required to flush linens of residual chemicals. Energy savings are also significant, because hot water is no longer required for washing.
  • Replace conventional washers with continuous batch systems. Batch washers use counter-current flow to recycle water and heat reducing water consumption.
  • Upgrade your conventional washer to a 4 star WELS-rated or higher.
  • Regularly check machines for leaks and ensure scheduled preventative maintenance takes place.

Pools and spas

The main loss of water from pools and spas comes from evaporation. You can reduce the amount of water lost to evaporation by covering pools and spas when they're not in use. This will help keep your pool clean and the water warmer, and will save you from topping up the pool/spa as often.

Top 7 tips:

  • Check for leaks regularly.
  • Fix any leaks as fast as possible.
  • Correct the chemical balance. This will mean you won't have to empty your pool as often
  • Reduce backwash frequency and volume if possible – check with your council to confirm guidelines.
  • Check that the filter works properly.
  • Keep a cover on your pool when it's not in use to limit the number of times you have to top it up.
  • Keep pool temperatures at the minimum acceptable to reduce water loss through evaporation.

Garden areas

  1. Install a drip or soak system. These systems direct the water to where it's most needed, making your watering more efficient.
  2. Use mulch to prevent water loss through evaporation and to prevent soil erosion. Mulch can also help to smother your weeds. If you live in a high bushfire risk area, check with the Country Fire Service (CFS) about the best way to use mulch.
  3. Plant native plants for your area. Check with your local nursery, Trees for Life, the Australian Plants Society or State Flora to choose the best species for your garden.
  4. Plant your garden in watering zones, known as hydrozoning. Grouping plants that require similar amounts of water will help you control your water use.
  5. Choose a drought resistant lawn, and train it to use less water. By training your lawn to use less water, it will encourage the roots to grow deeper. You can also set your mower blades higher during summer to let your lawn grow longer. Keeping grass longer shades the soil surface and reduces evaporation loss.
  6. Don't water during windy weather. The water will just blow away from where it's most needed.
  7. Waterproof terracotta pots before you use them. Terracotta pots are porous and allow moisture to escape rapidly.
  8. Keep outdoor pools and spas covered. Not only will the cover help keep them clean, the covers will reduce evaporation.
  9. Park your car on the lawn before you wash it to stop water running off into the stormwater drain. Alternatively, check out your nearest car washes and find one that recycles its water.
  10. Clean paved areas with a broom or rake. Hosing them down is usually unnecessary and just wastes water.

Evaporative air conditioners

  • Regularly check for leaks and excessive bleed.
  • As units age, performance can become compromised. Regular maintenance and servicing is recommended to maintain efficiency.

Kitchens

Dishwasher use

  • Train your staff to use the best wash program for the job.
  • Run rack dishwashers only when they are full.
  • Recycle the final rinse and use it as a pre-rinse water source.
  • Hand-scrape dishes instead of rinsing before loading into the dishwasher.
  • Plug your sink to wash and rinse dishes, instead of having the tap running continuously.

Ice machines

  • Replace water-cooled 'once through' ice machines with air-cooled ice machines.
  • Re-circulate cooling water in water-cooled ice machines.
  • Adjust ice machines to manufacture and dispense only the necessary required amount of ice.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Install water-efficient devices and fixtures (above WELS 3-star), such as in line flow restrictors or flow restriction aerators* to both hot and cold kitchen taps and hand basins.
  • Adjust flow to best-practice flow rates.
  • Install pedal or sensor operated tap controllers. This will eliminate taps left running and improve user hygiene.
  • Install spring-loaded so that water shuts off when the handle is released.
  • Replace inefficient pre-rinse spray guns with WELS 6-star-rated low-flow, high-pressure guns. Replacing one pre-rinse spray gun could save up to 250 kL annually, with the additional benefit of energy costs associated with reduced hot water use.
  • Check flow rates on all equipment.
  • Adjust equipment to the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Replace dishwasher spray heads with more water-efficient heads, or install flow regulators.
  • Install strainers or traps with mesh screens to collect food waste.
  • Dispose of food waste in bins or compost instead of garbage disposal units that use water.
  • Replace water-cooled wok stoves with air-cooled wok stoves.
  • Install flange restriction devices or valve controllers to reduce the amount of water used on existing water-cooled woks.

Download and read our fact sheet about commercial kitchens for more information for more tips and information. [PDF, 446 kB]

Councils and Schools

Cooling towers

Top tips for reducing water used by your cooling tower

  • Install a sub meter on the make-up water line to monitor cooling tower water usage.
  • Check for water loss through leaks, faulty float valves, overflowing, splashing, or other.
  • Check that water efficiency is part of the servicing agreement with your cooling tower contractors.
  • Check that bleed solenoids or valves are functioning correctly for both operation and closing.
  • Use good quality water for cooling tower make-up. Poor or inadequate quality water may need to be treated prior to topping up a cooling tower
  • Use rainwater for make-up water (Filtration and/or treatment may be required)
  • Ensure drift eliminators are fitted.
  • Use alternative water treatment methods, like ozone, ionisation and ultra-violet disinfection. These allow towers to operate at higher cycles of concentrations, reducing blowdown, chemical requirements and associated costs.
  • Use cooling tower bleed for toilet flushing or wash down.
  • Return condensate from cooling coils back to the tower. This is generally clean cool water.
  • Minimise heat loading on towers where possible. You can keep lighting to a minimum, and turn machinery off when not in use.
  • Ensure your service contractor cleans and recalibrates the TDS / pH sensors on a regular basis. These records should all be available from your contractor and stored for future reference.
  • Set TDS bleed to the maximum SA Water limit of 2,000mg/L (see Trade Waste Guideline No. 16) if you are discharging cooling tower waste to a sewer. This will maximise the number of times water can be cycled through the tower.
  • Install automatic bleed and dosing equipment controlled by TDS and pH sensors. This will ensure that the tower only bleeds once a set limit has been reached. It also makes sure that the tower is dosed adequately to maximise cycles of concentration.

Download and read our information sheet about cooling towers to learn how you can improve their efficiencies.

Irrigated public open spaces

Kitchens

Dishwasher use

  • Train your staff to use the best wash program for the job.
  • Run rack dishwashers only when they are full.
  • Recycle the final rinse and use it as a pre-rinse water source.
  • Hand-scrape dishes instead of rinsing before loading into the dishwasher.
  • Plug your sink to wash and rinse dishes, instead of having the tap running continuously.

Ice machines

  • Replace water-cooled 'once through' ice machines with air-cooled ice machines.
  • Re-circulate cooling water in water-cooled ice machines.
  • Adjust ice machines to manufacture and dispense only the necessary required amount of ice.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Install water-efficient devices and fixtures (above WELS 3-star), such as in line flow restrictors or flow restriction aerators* to both hot and cold kitchen taps and hand basins.
  • Adjust flow to best-practice flow rates.
  • Install pedal or sensor operated tap controllers. This will eliminate taps left running and improve user hygiene.
  • Install spring-loaded so that water shuts off when the handle is released.
  • Replace inefficient pre-rinse spray guns with WELS 6-star-rated low-flow, high-pressure guns. Replacing one pre-rinse spray gun could save up to 250 kL annually, with the additional benefit of energy costs associated with reduced hot water use.
  • Check flow rates on all equipment.
  • Adjust equipment to the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Replace dishwasher spray heads with more water-efficient heads, or install flow regulators.
  • Install strainers or traps with mesh screens to collect food waste.
  • Dispose of food waste in bins or compost instead of garbage disposal units that use water.
  • Replace water-cooled wok stoves with air-cooled wok stoves.
  • Install flange restriction devices or valve controllers to reduce the amount of water used on existing water-cooled woks.

Download and read our fact sheet about commercial kitchens for more information for more tips and information. [PDF, 446 kB]

Pools and spas

The main loss of water from pools and spas comes from evaporation. You can reduce the amount of water lost to evaporation by covering pools and spas when they're not in use. This will help keep your pool clean and the water warmer, and will save you from topping up the pool/spa as often.

Top 7 tips:

  • Check for leaks regularly.
  • Fix any leaks as fast as possible.
  • Correct the chemical balance. This will mean you won't have to empty your pool as often
  • Reduce backwash frequency and volume if possible – check with your council to confirm guidelines.
  • Check that the filter works properly.
  • Keep a cover on your pool when it's not in use to limit the number of times you have to top it up.
  • Keep pool temperatures at the minimum acceptable to reduce water loss through evaporation.

Evaporative air conditioners

  • Regularly check for leaks and excessive bleed.
  • As units age, performance can become compromised. Regular maintenance and servicing is recommended to maintain efficiency.

Cooling towers

Top tips for reducing water used by your cooling tower

  • Install a sub meter on the make-up water line to monitor cooling tower water usage.
  • Check for water loss through leaks, faulty float valves, overflowing, splashing, or other.
  • Check that water efficiency is part of the servicing agreement with your cooling tower contractors.
  • Check that bleed solenoids or valves are functioning correctly for both operation and closing.
  • Use good quality water for cooling tower make-up. Poor or inadequate quality water may need to be treated prior to topping up a cooling tower
  • Use rainwater for make-up water (Filtration and/or treatment may be required)
  • Ensure drift eliminators are fitted.
  • Use alternative water treatment methods, like ozone, ionisation and ultra-violet disinfection. These allow towers to operate at higher cycles of concentrations, reducing blowdown, chemical requirements and associated costs.
  • Use cooling tower bleed for toilet flushing or wash down.
  • Return condensate from cooling coils back to the tower. This is generally clean cool water.
  • Minimise heat loading on towers where possible. You can keep lighting to a minimum, and turn machinery off when not in use.
  • Ensure your service contractor cleans and recalibrates the TDS / pH sensors on a regular basis. These records should all be available from your contractor and stored for future reference.
  • Set TDS bleed to the maximum SA Water limit of 2,000mg/L (see Trade Waste Guideline No. 16) if you are discharging cooling tower waste to a sewer. This will maximise the number of times water can be cycled through the tower.
  • Install automatic bleed and dosing equipment controlled by TDS and pH sensors. This will ensure that the tower only bleeds once a set limit has been reached. It also makes sure that the tower is dosed adequately to maximise cycles of concentration.

Download and read our information sheet about cooling towers to learn how you can improve their efficiencies.

Pools and spas

The main loss of water from pools and spas comes from evaporation. You can reduce the amount of water lost to evaporation by covering pools and spas when they're not in use. This will help keep your pool clean and the water warmer, and will save you from topping up the pool/spa as often.

Top 7 tips:

  • Check for leaks regularly.
  • Fix any leaks as fast as possible.
  • Correct the chemical balance. This will mean you won't have to empty your pool as often
  • Reduce backwash frequency and volume if possible – check with your council to confirm guidelines.
  • Check that the filter works properly.
  • Keep a cover on your pool when it's not in use to limit the number of times you have to top it up.
  • Keep pool temperatures at the minimum acceptable to reduce water loss through evaporation.

Garden areas

  1. Install a drip or soak system. These systems direct the water to where it's most needed, making your watering more efficient.
  2. Use mulch to prevent water loss through evaporation and to prevent soil erosion. Mulch can also help to smother your weeds. If you live in a high bushfire risk area, check with the Country Fire Service (CFS) about the best way to use mulch.
  3. Plant native plants for your area. Check with your local nursery, Trees for Life, the Australian Plants Society or State Flora to choose the best species for your garden.
  4. Plant your garden in watering zones, known as hydrozoning. Grouping plants that require similar amounts of water will help you control your water use.
  5. Choose a drought resistant lawn, and train it to use less water. By training your lawn to use less water, it will encourage the roots to grow deeper. You can also set your mower blades higher during summer to let your lawn grow longer. Keeping grass longer shades the soil surface and reduces evaporation loss.
  6. Don't water during windy weather. The water will just blow away from where it's most needed.
  7. Waterproof terracotta pots before you use them. Terracotta pots are porous and allow moisture to escape rapidly.
  8. Keep outdoor pools and spas covered. Not only will the cover help keep them clean, the covers will reduce evaporation.
  9. Park your car on the lawn before you wash it to stop water running off into the stormwater drain. Alternatively, check out your nearest car washes and find one that recycles its water.
  10. Clean paved areas with a broom or rake. Hosing them down is usually unnecessary and just wastes water.

Kitchens

Dishwasher use

  • Train your staff to use the best wash program for the job.
  • Run rack dishwashers only when they are full.
  • Recycle the final rinse and use it as a pre-rinse water source.
  • Hand-scrape dishes instead of rinsing before loading into the dishwasher.
  • Plug your sink to wash and rinse dishes, instead of having the tap running continuously.

Ice machines

  • Replace water-cooled 'once through' ice machines with air-cooled ice machines.
  • Re-circulate cooling water in water-cooled ice machines.
  • Adjust ice machines to manufacture and dispense only the necessary required amount of ice.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Install water-efficient devices and fixtures (above WELS 3-star), such as in line flow restrictors or flow restriction aerators* to both hot and cold kitchen taps and hand basins.
  • Adjust flow to best-practice flow rates.
  • Install pedal or sensor operated tap controllers. This will eliminate taps left running and improve user hygiene.
  • Install spring-loaded so that water shuts off when the handle is released.
  • Replace inefficient pre-rinse spray guns with WELS 6-star-rated low-flow, high-pressure guns. Replacing one pre-rinse spray gun could save up to 250 kL annually, with the additional benefit of energy costs associated with reduced hot water use.
  • Check flow rates on all equipment.
  • Adjust equipment to the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Replace dishwasher spray heads with more water-efficient heads, or install flow regulators.
  • Install strainers or traps with mesh screens to collect food waste.
  • Dispose of food waste in bins or compost instead of garbage disposal units that use water.
  • Replace water-cooled wok stoves with air-cooled wok stoves.
  • Install flange restriction devices or valve controllers to reduce the amount of water used on existing water-cooled woks.

Download and read our fact sheet about commercial kitchens for more information for more tips and information. [PDF, 446 kB]

Laundries

To improve the water efficiency of your laundry, you can:

  • Outsource laundry cleaning to water-efficient commercial facilities.
  • Operate washing machines only when they are full.
  • Train and review staff performance to make sure laundry machines are operated correctly.
  • Use the manufacturer's recommended settings on each machine.
  • Check that the water level is correct during operation.
  • Discuss potential water efficiency improvements with your chemical supplier.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Retrofit a tank on the washer to capture final rinse water. Use it as pre-wash for the next cycle
  • Convert cooling operations to closed loop systems on dry cleaning machines with single-pass cooling.
  • Install an ozone system to reduce the need for chemicals and water. Fewer rinse cycles are required to flush linens of residual chemicals. Energy savings are also significant, because hot water is no longer required for washing.
  • Replace conventional washers with continuous batch systems. Batch washers use counter-current flow to recycle water and heat reducing water consumption.
  • Upgrade your conventional washer to a 4 star WELS-rated or higher.
  • Regularly check machines for leaks and ensure scheduled preventative maintenance takes place.

Evaporative air conditioners

  • Regularly check for leaks and excessive bleed.
  • As units age, performance can become compromised. Regular maintenance and servicing is recommended to maintain efficiency.

Manufacturing

Cooling towers

Top tips for reducing water used by your cooling tower

  • Install a sub meter on the make-up water line to monitor cooling tower water usage.
  • Check for water loss through leaks, faulty float valves, overflowing, splashing, or other.
  • Check that water efficiency is part of the servicing agreement with your cooling tower contractors.
  • Check that bleed solenoids or valves are functioning correctly for both operation and closing.
  • Use good quality water for cooling tower make-up. Poor or inadequate quality water may need to be treated prior to topping up a cooling tower
  • Use rainwater for make-up water (Filtration and/or treatment may be required)
  • Ensure drift eliminators are fitted.
  • Use alternative water treatment methods, like ozone, ionisation and ultra-violet disinfection. These allow towers to operate at higher cycles of concentrations, reducing blowdown, chemical requirements and associated costs.
  • Use cooling tower bleed for toilet flushing or wash down.
  • Return condensate from cooling coils back to the tower. This is generally clean cool water.
  • Minimise heat loading on towers where possible. You can keep lighting to a minimum, and turn machinery off when not in use.
  • Ensure your service contractor cleans and recalibrates the TDS / pH sensors on a regular basis. These records should all be available from your contractor and stored for future reference.
  • Set TDS bleed to the maximum SA Water limit of 2,000mg/L (see Trade Waste Guideline No. 16) if you are discharging cooling tower waste to a sewer. This will maximise the number of times water can be cycled through the tower.
  • Install automatic bleed and dosing equipment controlled by TDS and pH sensors. This will ensure that the tower only bleeds once a set limit has been reached. It also makes sure that the tower is dosed adequately to maximise cycles of concentration.

Download and read our information sheet about cooling towers to learn how you can improve their efficiencies.

Kitchens

Dishwasher use

  • Train your staff to use the best wash program for the job.
  • Run rack dishwashers only when they are full.
  • Recycle the final rinse and use it as a pre-rinse water source.
  • Hand-scrape dishes instead of rinsing before loading into the dishwasher.
  • Plug your sink to wash and rinse dishes, instead of having the tap running continuously.

Ice machines

  • Replace water-cooled 'once through' ice machines with air-cooled ice machines.
  • Re-circulate cooling water in water-cooled ice machines.
  • Adjust ice machines to manufacture and dispense only the necessary required amount of ice.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Install water-efficient devices and fixtures (above WELS 3-star), such as in line flow restrictors or flow restriction aerators* to both hot and cold kitchen taps and hand basins.
  • Adjust flow to best-practice flow rates.
  • Install pedal or sensor operated tap controllers. This will eliminate taps left running and improve user hygiene.
  • Install spring-loaded so that water shuts off when the handle is released.
  • Replace inefficient pre-rinse spray guns with WELS 6-star-rated low-flow, high-pressure guns. Replacing one pre-rinse spray gun could save up to 250 kL annually, with the additional benefit of energy costs associated with reduced hot water use.
  • Check flow rates on all equipment.
  • Adjust equipment to the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Replace dishwasher spray heads with more water-efficient heads, or install flow regulators.
  • Install strainers or traps with mesh screens to collect food waste.
  • Dispose of food waste in bins or compost instead of garbage disposal units that use water.
  • Replace water-cooled wok stoves with air-cooled wok stoves.
  • Install flange restriction devices or valve controllers to reduce the amount of water used on existing water-cooled woks.

Download and read our fact sheet about commercial kitchens for more information for more tips and information. [PDF, 446 kB]

Laundries

To improve the water efficiency of your laundry, you can:

  • Outsource laundry cleaning to water-efficient commercial facilities.
  • Operate washing machines only when they are full.
  • Train and review staff performance to make sure laundry machines are operated correctly.
  • Use the manufacturer's recommended settings on each machine.
  • Check that the water level is correct during operation.
  • Discuss potential water efficiency improvements with your chemical supplier.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Retrofit a tank on the washer to capture final rinse water. Use it as pre-wash for the next cycle
  • Convert cooling operations to closed loop systems on dry cleaning machines with single-pass cooling.
  • Install an ozone system to reduce the need for chemicals and water. Fewer rinse cycles are required to flush linens of residual chemicals. Energy savings are also significant, because hot water is no longer required for washing.
  • Replace conventional washers with continuous batch systems. Batch washers use counter-current flow to recycle water and heat reducing water consumption.
  • Upgrade your conventional washer to a 4 star WELS-rated or higher.
  • Regularly check machines for leaks and ensure scheduled preventative maintenance takes place.

Evaporative air conditioners

  • Regularly check for leaks and excessive bleed.
  • As units age, performance can become compromised. Regular maintenance and servicing is recommended to maintain efficiency.

Irrigated public open spaces

Kitchens

Dishwasher use

  • Train your staff to use the best wash program for the job.
  • Run rack dishwashers only when they are full.
  • Recycle the final rinse and use it as a pre-rinse water source.
  • Hand-scrape dishes instead of rinsing before loading into the dishwasher.
  • Plug your sink to wash and rinse dishes, instead of having the tap running continuously.

Ice machines

  • Replace water-cooled 'once through' ice machines with air-cooled ice machines.
  • Re-circulate cooling water in water-cooled ice machines.
  • Adjust ice machines to manufacture and dispense only the necessary required amount of ice.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Install water-efficient devices and fixtures (above WELS 3-star), such as in line flow restrictors or flow restriction aerators* to both hot and cold kitchen taps and hand basins.
  • Adjust flow to best-practice flow rates.
  • Install pedal or sensor operated tap controllers. This will eliminate taps left running and improve user hygiene.
  • Install spring-loaded so that water shuts off when the handle is released.
  • Replace inefficient pre-rinse spray guns with WELS 6-star-rated low-flow, high-pressure guns. Replacing one pre-rinse spray gun could save up to 250 kL annually, with the additional benefit of energy costs associated with reduced hot water use.
  • Check flow rates on all equipment.
  • Adjust equipment to the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Replace dishwasher spray heads with more water-efficient heads, or install flow regulators.
  • Install strainers or traps with mesh screens to collect food waste.
  • Dispose of food waste in bins or compost instead of garbage disposal units that use water.
  • Replace water-cooled wok stoves with air-cooled wok stoves.
  • Install flange restriction devices or valve controllers to reduce the amount of water used on existing water-cooled woks.

Download and read our fact sheet about commercial kitchens for more information for more tips and information. [PDF, 446 kB]

Laundries

To improve the water efficiency of your laundry, you can:

  • Outsource laundry cleaning to water-efficient commercial facilities.
  • Operate washing machines only when they are full.
  • Train and review staff performance to make sure laundry machines are operated correctly.
  • Use the manufacturer's recommended settings on each machine.
  • Check that the water level is correct during operation.
  • Discuss potential water efficiency improvements with your chemical supplier.

Potential water-saving opportunities

  • Retrofit a tank on the washer to capture final rinse water. Use it as pre-wash for the next cycle
  • Convert cooling operations to closed loop systems on dry cleaning machines with single-pass cooling.
  • Install an ozone system to reduce the need for chemicals and water. Fewer rinse cycles are required to flush linens of residual chemicals. Energy savings are also significant, because hot water is no longer required for washing.
  • Replace conventional washers with continuous batch systems. Batch washers use counter-current flow to recycle water and heat reducing water consumption.
  • Upgrade your conventional washer to a 4 star WELS-rated or higher.
  • Regularly check machines for leaks and ensure scheduled preventative maintenance takes place.

Pools and spas

Before putting in a pool or spa, make sure you get an Exemption Permit from SA Water. This permit lets you fill the pool or spa.

As part of the permit conditions, you must have a Smart Approved WaterMark pool cover (or a liquid blanket with an auto-doser or six months' supply). We will want to see proof of purchase before giving you the permit.

Garden areas

  1. Install a drip or soak system. These systems direct the water to where it's most needed, making your watering more efficient.
  2. Use mulch to prevent water loss through evaporation and to prevent soil erosion. Mulch can also help to smother your weeds. If you live in a high bushfire risk area, check with the Country Fire Service (CFS) about the best way to use mulch.
  3. Plant native plants for your area. Check with your local nursery, Trees for Life, the Australian Plants Society or State Flora to choose the best species for your garden.
  4. Plant your garden in watering zones, known as hydrozoning. Grouping plants that require similar amounts of water will help you control your water use.
  5. Choose a drought resistant lawn, and train it to use less water. By training your lawn to use less water, it will encourage the roots to grow deeper. You can also set your mower blades higher during summer to let your lawn grow longer. Keeping grass longer shades the soil surface and reduces evaporation loss.
  6. Don't water during windy weather. The water will just blow away from where it's most needed.
  7. Waterproof terracotta pots before you use them. Terracotta pots are porous and allow moisture to escape rapidly.
  8. Keep outdoor pools and spas covered. Not only will the cover help keep them clean, the covers will reduce evaporation.
  9. Park your car on the lawn before you wash it to stop water running off into the stormwater drain. Alternatively, check out your nearest car washes and find one that recycles its water.
  10. Clean paved areas with a broom or rake. Hosing them down is usually unnecessary and just wastes water.

Evaporative air conditioners

  • Regularly check for leaks and excessive bleed.
  • As units age, performance can become compromised. Regular maintenance and servicing is recommended to maintain efficiency.


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  • Major faults

  • Reported

  • Hambidge Tce
  • Whyalla
  • 23/06/2017
  • Water Off
  • Last Updated: 23/06/2017 11:53 AM - We are on-site responding to an incident in Whyalla. Water may not be available in the surrounding area until 23/06/2017 05:40 PM. Traffic restrictions may also apply. Reference Number WO: 05878300.

  • See all major faults

  • Scheduled works

  • Underway
  • Calstock Av
  • Edwardstown
  • 23/06/2017
  • Supply Interruption
  • Estimated start time (water off): 27/06/2017 09:00 AM
    Estimated restore time (water back on): 27/06/2017 04:00 PM

    We’re committed to improving your services and are undertaking maintenance work in Edwardstown. Water supply in the surrounding area may be impacted during the above times. Traffic restrictions may also apply.


  • See all scheduled works